Skip to main content

Websync, web interface to manage your rsync tasks

Rsync is a great tool to replicate, sync some data on your computer. And I’m heavily relying on it to backup my server and to mirror some opensource projects and GNU/Linux Distributions.

But I’ve recently found a Web interface to manage all my rsync tasks called websync.

Websync is a web based rsync task manager where you can add, edit, clone, remove, scheduled,…. your rsync tasks while being able to have a remote host as source or destination of the task (With SSH RSA key too)

websync screenshot main tasks

 

Under the free license MIT, Websync has been developped by Sander Struijk and is still actively being maintained, as you can see on github forum. But it is still an early project, so if you face any issue, make sure to report them on the issue tracker.

Interested to give it a shot, here is how to install Websync!

Installation

You will first need to install node.js

1) Install nodejs and npm

– If you use Ubuntu, simple run (as root)

– If you are on Debian (Wheezy?) like me, you can install nodejs from wheezy-backports (modify your source.list accordingly) and run (in root):

and for npm, you can use the installer (still in root)

2) Install the global packages bower and gulp

In root, run,

3) Clone the git repository into the folder of your choice.

This time, you need to run these commands with your regular user.

4) Install Websync

If you have any missing package it will tell you. I had the error “Cannot find module ‘imagemin-gifsicle'”, I’ve simply run:

and rerun:

5) Start Websync

Done!

You should now be able to access to your Websync instance through http://YourIP:3000

 

sync turn signal

ShareFest, Web based P2P file sharing

ShareFest logoPlenty of services exist to share files, the famous one like Dropbox, Google drive, etc… or some services to selfhost such as Pydio, Owncloud, (already covered in this blog).

 

But not many are using Peer to Peer and even less are web based. But it’s the case of ShareFest and thanks to HTML5 WebRTC, no need of additional plugins to share your files.

Indeed, ShareFest, javascript-based, allow you and your user to simply drag and drop a file into their web browser to get a URL to share to anyone. Then the file transfer will be in P2P. Obviously, as soon as you leave the page, the transfer/sharing stop. But then, the more people having your URL open, the more seeders.

A demo is available here.

Let’s see now how to install ShareFest on your own server.

Installation

1) Install nodejs and npm

– If you use Ubuntu, simple run (as root)

– If you are on Debian (Wheezy?) like me, you can install nodejs from wheezy-backports (modify your source.list accordingly) and run (in root):

and for npm, you can use the installer

2) Clone their latest release into your /var/www folder

If you don’t have git installed, simply run:

Then clone their repo

3) Install the required dependencies with npm

4) Start the service

and you should now be good to start!

Simply go to http://YourIP:13337

If you want to know more about ShareFest, you can check their growing FAQ.

Your next step could be to set up a virtualhost to have a more userfriendly URL like sf.domain.tld and even force SSL connection.

 

Virtualhost configuration

What you will need:

1) Create a A redirection in your DNS server/registrar with sf.domain.tld to your IP

2) Have SSL certificate ready. If not you can read this tutorial. (Optional)

3) Create your virtualhost as following:

In /etc/apache2/sites-enabled/, create a file called sharefest (In root):

and paste the following content:

Adapt the content (Servername, webmaster, SSL certificate and directory).

When done, save the file (CTRL+X then Yes) and reload apache: (In root)

Now your ShareFest instance should be fully working will SSL certificate and accessible through sf.domain.tld.

Justbrowsing-calculator – Web based calculator

Short article on a rather uncommon need, a web based calculator!

The justbrowsing-calculator is a calculator supporting most of basic needs for a calculator (addition, substraction, multiplication, division, power, square root).

Forked from HTML5Calculator, the design is rather standard but works like a charm and is damn easy to install!

justbrowsing calculator

The best is still to give it a try.

Although I’m not sure how useful it is, it’s an interesting application.

So here is how to install the justbrowsing calculator.

Installation

1) Install git (if not available)

On top of a LAMP server, you will also need git as we are going to directly clone the project’s repo. In root, simply run:

2) Clone the repo in your /var/www

and that’s all!!

You can now access to your online calculator on http://YourIP/justbrowsing-calculator

Most probably, you may want to set up a sub domain or domain to easily access to your web-based calculator. Like calc.freedif.org

Virtualhost configuration

What you will need:

1) Create a A redirection in your DNS server/registrar with calc.domain.tld to your IP

2) Create your virtualhost as following:

In /etc/apache2/sites-enabled/, create a file called justbrowsing-calculator (In root):

and paste/modify the following content:

Adapt the content (Servername, webmaster’s mail and directory).

When done, save the file (CTRL+X then Yes) and reload apache: (In root)

Now your good to go!

Mergely, compare 2 documents through an online interface

mergely logoSome of you may already be familiar with diff, the Linux command based file comparison that outputs the differences between two documents. If you are, Mergely is the same but as a Web Interface.

 

Working in most modern web browsers (Firefox 2+,Chrome, Internet Exporer 9+,Safari 3+ and Opera 9+), through its simple web interface, you simply need to upload 2 files to compare and Mergely, will highlights changes in the text.

If you are concerned about privacy (You should!!!), don’t fear, your documents never leave your browser, except if you save them, in that case a copy will be saved on the server.

You can have an idea of the power of the tool through checking their demo, United States Declaration of Independence, first draft written by Thomas Jefferson, and then published.

Mergely Screenshot

But the best is to install it on your own server and here is how:

Installation

1) Install jQuery and CodeMirror

Simply run:

2) Clone their git master branch into your /var/www

The most simple will be to directly clone their git repository. If you don’t have git install, simply run as root (or with sudo):

and then, simply clone Mergely into your /var/www folder

 

And you should now be able to access to Mergely web interface through http://YourIP/Mergely/editor